Home Town Flavor – Part 2 {Chronicle}


Part 2 of  Home Town Flavor {Chronicle}.   This is the second of four parts.  Part 1 shows the streets, their intersections, and the view of the Upper Valley.  [The Upper Valley is comprised of Lebanon and Hanover, NH, and Hartford, VT, located in the valley formed by the intersection of the White and Connecticut Rivers.]

The main destination of my 2013 Road Trip was the town in New Hampshire where I grew up,  West Lebanon.  This series of posts is an overall view.  You may view a post on the houses I lived in here { From Main Street to the Corner House}.

The photos in this post are not shared for their photography,

but for their sentiment.  They are a bit random.

I lived in W.Lebanon in the 60s and early 70s.

There were three churches in town then, all on Maple Street.  From what I saw there are only two now, both on Maple Street.  The old buildings are there, empty and forsaken.

Everyone in my class was either a Congregationalist or a Catholic, except the mailman’s daughter, who didn’t go to church.  And me.  I was am a Baptist.  My church was across the river in Hartford.  We’ll get to that in another post.

This is the Congregational Church, or Congo church as we called it.  From its website it appears to be an active church.  I recognized a couple of names in a newsletter.

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This is the Catholic Church.  I’m not sure what the name of it was.  I want to say Holy Redeemer, but I’m not sure.  The French, Italian and Irish families attended, along with some others.  There was no discrimination among us.  We accepted each other as we were.

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I’m not sure what happened to this church.  I can’t find a Catholic church in W. Lebanon online, nor did I see a new building.  This one is quite deserted.  Back in the day the parking lot was huge.  I was secretly pleased to see a new church building where part of the parking lot had been.  Here it is.

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At the far end of Maple Street was the Seventh Day Adventist Church and Estabrook School.  I was sure surprised to see it standing empty and forlorn.  Our downstairs neighbors at 68 Maple were Seventh Day Adventists.  The school was quite active, though I never knew any of the students.

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I kept on the lookout as I traveled about, and was not surprised to find a new Estabrook School in neighboring Plainfield, NH.

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That’s it for the churches in W. Lebanon, on Maple Street at any rate.  Now that I think of it there was one more on Seminary Hill by the time I was in high school.  I did not drive by there on this trip, so can’t say.

If you know of other new additions or gaps in my memory, feel free to contribute to the comments.

Hope you enjoyed Home Town Flavor {Chronicle}.  The tour is not all-inclusive, but a good representation of the town for the purpose of remembering my childhood.  The day these pictures were taken was extremely hot and humid.  I hope to go back when it’s cooler to walk more.  This is Part 2 of 4 — more to come next month!

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Home Town Flavor – Part 1 {Chronicle}


Combining words and pictures for a taste of Home Town Flavor {Chronicle}.  Destination:  West Lebanon, New Hampshire.  First of four parts.  Part 1 shows the streets, their intersections, and the view of the Upper Valley.  [The Upper Valley is comprised of Lebanon and Hanover, NH, and Hartford, VT, located in the valley formed by the intersection of the White and Connecticut Rivers.]

The main destination of my 2013 Road Trip was the town in New Hampshire where I grew up,  West Lebanon.  Previous posts included some parts of the town.  W.Lebanon has operated separately from Lebanon in the past, but is currently part of the small city of Lebanon.

This series of posts is an overall view.  You may view a post on the houses I lived in here { From Main Street to the Corner House}.

The photos in this post are not shared for their photography,

but for their sentiment.  They are a bit random.

I lived in W.Lebanon in the 60s and early 70s.

Tons of change since then.

The Interstate (two of them) came through during that time.

Where we shopped at the Sears catalogue store

and the S&H Green Stamp store,

it is now a shopping mecca.

First a short explanation of the street layout.

Main Street runs north/south parallel to the Connecticut River, and becomes S. Main St. at the foot of Seminary Hill, where S. Main St. follows the course of the river westward and becomes Rte. 12A which goes to Plainfield, which is in the Lebanon School district.

Seminary Hill Rd. is the road to Lebanon, Rtes 4 & 10.  Main St. followed to the north (Rte. 10) takes you to Hanover.  Those are the only roads into town on the NH side of the river.  Bridge St. intersects with Main St. after coming up the hill from the Connecticut River  from Hartford, Vermont.

Maple St. runs parallel to the east of Main St. and curves to intersect Main St. at both ends.  There are four streets (Church St., Tracy St., Dana St., Highland ) which intersect Main and Maple Sts.  Prospect St. runs parallel to Main and Maple, between them.  Mack Ave. runs parallel to Maple to the east, along with two other streets, all of which run for a block or two.

Seminary Hill has three or four side streets, one block deep, on both sides.  S. Main has no side streets.  Crafts Ave. runs parallel to the west of Main St. with one intersecting street.  There are no other streets west of Main St.  Are you getting the picture?  W. Lebanon is still a small town.  There are a few new areas developed, but the streets are largely the same as in the ’60s.

Mt. Lebanon (or Crafts Hill?) rises to the east in the same valley as the town.  There are no roads to the east.  The road connecting Hanover to Lebanon, Rte. 120, is further to the east, curving around and not passing through this largely undeveloped woodland.  Rte. 120 runs to Claremont, NH to the south, after passing through the countryside of Meriden and Cornish.

The Appalachian Trail (AT) runs from Vermont, crossing the Connecticut River in Hanover, NH  northeasterly through the mountainous wilderness to the White Mountain National Forest.

Now for a pictorial tour of the streets of W.Lebanon, New Hampshire, nestled between the mountain to the east, and the Connecticut River to the west.

View to the east toward W. Lebanon at I-89 overpass on Rte. 12A.

View to the east toward W. Lebanon at I-89 overpass on Rte. 12A. The Sunoco station was there when I was growing up.

Powerhouse Mall at the intersection of  Glen Rd. and Rte. 12A in W. Lebanon, NH.

Powerhouse Mall at the intersection of Glen Rd. and Rte. 12A in W. Lebanon, NH.

One of many shopping plazas on Rte. 12A in W. Lebanon, NH

One of many shopping plazas on Rte. 12A in W. Lebanon, NH.  Hey, looks like a thistle on top of the sign!  Highly recommend Cantore’s Pizza 🙂

Intersection of Main, Maple, South Main Sts. and Seminary Hill Rd. viewed from South Main.  Straight ahead is Maple St. Main St. is to the left, Seminary Hill to the right.

Intersection of Main, Maple, South Main Sts. and Seminary Hill Rd. viewed from South Main. Straight ahead is Maple St. and the ‘Congo’ (Congregational) Church.  Main St. is to the left, Seminary Hill to the right.

Intersection of South Main St. and Seminary Hill Rd. aka Rtes. 4/10 in W. Lebanon, NH.

Intersection of South Main St. and Seminary Hill Rd. aka Rtes. 4/10 in W. Lebanon, NH.

View of Main St. looking north from Seminary Hill in W. Lebanon, NH

View of Main St. looking north from Seminary Hill in W. Lebanon, NH

Seminary Hill Rd. sign at the end of Elm St. in W. Lebanon, NH

Seminary Hill Rd. sign at the end of Elm St. in W. Lebanon, NH

View to the north on Rte. 4/10 from Seminary Hill Rd, W. Lebanon, NH.  Large white apartment building is on corner of Maple and Main Sts. at the bottom of Seminary Hill.

View to the north on Rte. 4/10 from Seminary Hill Rd, W. Lebanon, NH. Large white apartment building is on corner of Maple and Main Sts. at the bottom of Seminary Hill.

Intersection of Main and Tracy Streets, W. Lebanon, NH. and Kilton Public Library

Intersection of Main and Tracy Streets, W. Lebanon, NH. and Kilton Public Library

 View up Tracy St. from Main St. facing east. Kilborn Library to the left. This is the street I walked down to get downtown.

View up Tracy St. from Main St. facing east. Kilborn Library to the left. This is the street I walked down to get downtown.

View of Vermont from Bridge St. facing west. Road is diverted to new bridge over the Connecticut River, with old bridge to the right.

View of Vermont from Bridge St. facing west. Road is diverted to new bridge over the Connecticut River, with old bridge to the right.

Intersection of Main and Dana Sts. facing east from Bridge St. looking toward Dana St. in W. Lebanon, NH

Intersection of Main and Dana Sts. facing east from Bridge St. looking toward Dana St. in W. Lebanon, NH

View down Dana Street from Mt. Lebanon School, W. Lebanon, NH

View down Dana Street from Mt. Lebanon School, W. Lebanon, NH

NE and SE corners of the intersection of Maple and Dana Sts. from Dana Street, W. Lebanon, NH

NE and SE corners of the intersection of Maple and Dana Sts. from Dana Street, W. Lebanon, NH

View looking west down Dana St. from corner of Dana and Maple Streets, W. Lebanon, NH.

View looking west down Dana St. from corner of Dana and Maple Streets, W. Lebanon, NH.  The porch on the left is 18 Dana, aka the ‘corner house’ here.

View to the west from Highland Ave. between Maple and Main Sts. in W. Lebanon, NH.

View of Vermont to the west from Highland Ave. between Maple and Main Sts. in W. Lebanon, NH. This is the street/hill I walked up to school in 2nd grade.

Hope you enjoyed Home Town Flavor {Chronicle}.  The tour is not all-inclusive, but a good representation of the town for the purpose of remembering my childhood.  The day these pictures were taken was extremely hot and humid.  I hope to go back when it’s cooler to walk more.  This is Part 1 of 4 — more to come next month!

A Bibliophile’s Dream House {Read}


The most important room in my dream house is the library, with it’s floor to ceiling, wall-to-wall book lined shelves.  If I had my way, I would have kept every book I ever had, and kept building shelves to accommodate all my books.

But I don’t live in my dream house, and for all my life, wherever I have called home, the public (or college) library has been my favorite place.  The library is  A Bibliophile’s Dream House {Read}.

Children's room, Racine Public Library

Children’s room, Racine Public Library

One of the highlights of my 2013 Road Trip was visiting the new library in the town where I grew up.  The Kilton Public Library is on Main Street, diagonally across from the (tiny) old library, which I frequented as a kid.  The new library, built in 2010,  is state-of-the-art-green, with heat-censored lighting and awesome air conditioning (it was extremely hot and humid when I was there).

Let’s take a tour of the old and the new.  Some of these photos I’ve shared before (still searching for the post):

The rear entrance of the new library, where I entered from the parking lot.

The rear entrance of the new library, where I entered from the parking lot.

The front entrance of the new library opens onto Main Street.

The front entrance of the new library opens onto Main Street.

The old W. Lebanon library on Main Street.

The old W. Lebanon library on Main Street.

The old library was sold by the city of Lebanon to a developer who has put it back on the market, according to this September 2014 article in the Valley News.

The new library is across the street from the old one.

The new library is across the street from the old one.

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Windows from the old library encased in the wall between the adult and children’s sections of the new library.

Front of the old W. Lebanon library, with replacement windows for stained glass ones.

Front of the old W. Lebanon library, with replacement windows for stained glass ones.

Rear section of old W.Lebanon library.

Rear section of old W.Lebanon library.

Basement of old W.Lebanon library housed the police station.

Basement of old W.Lebanon library housed the police station.

View of the old W.Lebanon library from the new library across Main Street.  Those trees weren't there in the 1960's when I waited for the school bus on that corner :).  Neither was the tire store, but everything else is the same (the buildings, not their occupants).

View of new W.Lebanon library from across Main Street. Those trees weren’t there in the 1960’s when I waited for the school bus on that corner :). Neither was the tire store, but everything else is the same (the buildings, not their occupants).

View of the new W.Lebanon library from the side street, whose name escapes me :)

Side view of the new W.Lebanon library from Tracy Street.

And that is the pictorial story of my earliest bibliophile days.  Looking at these photos of the new and the old, brings back so many memories.  This side street is the one we walked down daily, sometimes several times.

I remember eating nickel ice cream bars walking up this street.  Chocolate eclairs were my favorite.  Bob’s Market, the Red Cross Pharmacy, the Post Office, Dairy Queen — oh, yes, and the library — were all within a block of this street.  My house was a block to the north of it.

Small town girl.  Bibliophile.  Lover of history and architecture (my father was an architectural  draftsman).  Good times.

Where did you get your love of reading?  What was your library like?  

Have you visited the places of your beginnings?  

What made you who you are today?

Thank you for journeying with me today, and letting me share a bit of history with you in A Bibliophile’s Dream House {Read}.

Racine children's room

Racine children’s room

Racine children's room

Racine children’s room